Speed Read

A World Of Face Masks And Facial Recognition (Cosmo Magazine, Sep 08, 2020)
It’s surprising how quickly public opinion can change. Winding the clocks back 12 months, many of us would have looked at a masked individual in public with suspicion. Now, some countries have enshrined face mask use in law. They’ve also been made compulsory in Victoria and are recommended in several other states.
 

Face Masks And Facial Recognition Will Both Be Common In The Future. How Will They Co-exist? (The conversation, Sep 08, 2020)
It’s surprising how quickly public opinion can change. Winding the clocks back 12 months, many of us would have looked at a masked individual in public with suspicion. Now, some countries have enshrined face mask use in law. They’ve also been made compulsory in Victoria and are recommended in several other states.
 

Dems Propose 5-Year Wait On Facial Recognition Technology (https://www.post-journal.com/news/local-news/2020/09/dems-propose-5-year-wait-on-facial-recognition-technology/, Sep 08, 2020)
State legislators want a five-year moratorium on use of any system that would pair facial recognition or biometric surveillance systems on police body cameras.
 

Face Masks And Facial Recognition Will Both Be Common In The Future. How Will They Co-exist? (WMC, Sep 08, 2020)
Long lines and close contact could become things of the past at Transportation Security Administration checkpoints. To increase security and promote social distancing, the TSA is testing touchless facial recognition technology to get you to your gate. “We want to do what we can to have fewer touchpoints for passengers, obviously, especially due to the pandemic,” said TSA spokesperson Lisa Farbstein.
 

In Conversation: NYT’s Kashmir Hill, And Learning To Live With Facial Recognition (Bob Sullivan, Sep 08, 2020)
“Privacy tends to lose when there is a clear public safety use case.” And that probably means Clearview AI, and everything else like it, is here to stay. Now what? That’s today’s “In Conversation.” Earlier this year, Kashmir Hill of The New York Times broke one of the most important privacy stories in recent times — it was about a startup named Clearview AI that seemed to have achieved the Holy Grail of privacy invasions. Starting only with a face, the firm claimed it could identify most people, and instantly provide a dossier with dozens, or hundreds, of other images of that person. Already, the firm had an impressive list of law enforcement clients, she reported.
 

CBP Should Address Facial Recognition System Performance And Privacy Issues, GAO Says (Homeland Security Today, Sep 08, 2020)
A Government Accountability Office (GAO) review has found that U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has made progress testing and deploying facial recognition technology (FRT) at ports of entry to create entry-exit records for foreign nationals as part of its Biometric Entry-Exit Program. As of May 2020, CBP, in partnership with airlines, had deployed FRT to 27 airports to biometrically confirm travelers’ identities as they depart the United States (air exit) and was in the early stages of assessing FRT at sea and land ports of entry.
 

FMPD Wants To Use Face-recognition Technology To Solve Crimes (Wink News, Sep 08, 2020)
The Fort Myers Police Department is using facial features to solve crimes. The face-recognition technology is already in place and used on a daily basis by the same organization that issues driver’s licenses. Now, the FMPD is requesting access to the statewide database to help reduce crime in our neighborhoods. They want access to driver’s license photos, which when scanned, would allow them to help identify persons of interest or could help them locate a missing person, the agency said.
 

Stop Confusing Facial Recognition With Facial Authentication (Best Gaming Pro, Sep 08, 2020)
Amid the persevering with pandemic information and protests in opposition to systemic racism in our society, one other piece of reports has come to the fore: A number of the largest tech firms introduced they’d ban regulation enforcement from utilizing their facial recognition expertise. Amazon, IBM, and Microsoft made the transfer as protesters across the nation name for an finish to racial profiling and police brutality.
 

Eight Case Studies On Regulating Biometric Technology Show Us A Path Forward (Technology Review, Sep 08, 2020)
The national biometric ID system, conceived as a comprehensive identity program, sought to collect the fingerprints, iris scans, and photographs of all residents. It wasn’t long, Kak remembers, before stories about its devastating consequences began to spread. “We were suddenly hearing reports of how manual laborers who work with their hands—how their fingerprints were failing the system, and they were then being denied access to basic necessities,” she says. “We actually had starvation deaths in India that were being linked to the barriers that these biometric ID systems were creating. So it was a really crucial issue.”
 

DHS Files Rule Proposing Increasing Scope of Biometric Information Collection (Next Gov, Sep 08, 2020)
The Homeland Security Department Posted The Full Text Of A Proposal To The Federal Register That Would Give It The Ability To Collect More Biometric Information From Immigrants.
 

Chicago Police Launches New Data Program To Identify Stressed Out Cops (State Scoop, Sep 08, 2020)
The Chicago Police Department on Tuesday announced a new pilot project that uses data to monitor the mental health of police officers. It’s the city’s latest attempt at introducing police reforms that Mayor Lori Lightfoot says are only “the start” for increasing accountability.
 

China Launches Initiative To Set Global Data-Security Rules (Wall Street Journal, Sep 08, 2020)
China is launching its own initiative to set global standards on data security, countering U.S. efforts to persuade like-minded countries to ringfence their networks from Chinese technology.
 

Portland City Council Fractured And On Vacation (Oregon Live, Sep 08, 2020)
At a moment Portland hit a crisis point in its response to violent protests downtown and became an object of national derision over chaos in the streets, the Portland City Council hung out its “gone fishin’' sign.

 

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